The Areopagus and the International Criminal Court

I. Law as a performative mode of practice

 In July, I went to the International Criminal Court in The Hague. After a series of security, passport and baggage checks, I seated myself on the audience balcony in courtroom 1. At 12.30 the judge called for recess and we rose to mark respect. As the judges left the room, I too turned to leave, but just then, curtains snaked across the glass fronted balcony. Heavy pale green velvet, slowly cloaked the courtroom and it was then that realised that sometime in the last few hours the line between reality and play, trial and performance was not so crisp anymore.

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Palaces Without a People

My M.Phil dissertation, which was done with ‘Projective Cities’ at the Architectural Association school of Architecture in London from 2013-2015. The project looks at The Hague after the introduction of the International Criminal Court in the city and the increase in nongovernmental organisations in its wake. The project argues for a transnational forum that accumulates the existing civic and national fora and constructs a new space that reconciles issues of security with the need of constructing an audience for new intergovernmental politics.

 

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